Academic Policies

Classification of Students

Class Credits
Undergraduate Full-time 12+ Credits
Undergraduate Three-Quarter-time 9-11 Credits
Undergraduate Half-time 6-8 Credits
Undergraduate Less than Half-Time 0-5 Credits
Degree Seeking an Associate in Arts (AA), a Bachelor of Arts (BA), a Bachelor of Science (BS), a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN), or a Bachelor of Social Work (BSW). An associate degree is a minimum of 60 credit hours and a bachelor's degree is a minimum of 120 credit hours.
Non-Degree Not seeking a degree
Church Vocation Students Full-time students who are preparing themselves for one of the church vocations within The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod and have maintained a grade point average of at least 2.00

A student's class is determined by the total number of credits completed, including those accepted by Concordia from other colleges or universities, and is established as follows:

Class Credits
Freshman 0-29
Sophomore 30-59
Junior 60-89
Senior 90-graduation

Student Course Load for Full-Time Student

Semester Minimum Average Maximum
Regular Semester 12 15 18
Winterim 2 3 4
Summer 3 3 6

Grading

Formal reports of the student’s progress are available at the close of each term. The following grade point system is used in connection with these grades:

Letter Grade Points Per Credit
A Equals 4.00 points per credit
A- Equals 3.67 points per credit
B+ Equals 3.33 points per credit
B Equals 3.00 points per credit
B- Equals 2.67 points per credit
C+ Equals 2.33 points per credit
C Equals 2.00 points per credit
C- Equals 1.67 points per credit
D+ Equals 1.33 points per credit
D Equals 1.00 points per credit
D- Equals 0.67 points per credit
F Equals 0.00 points per credit
P 0.0 points pass in pass-fail course, not computed in grade point average, credits counted.
NC 0.0 points, failure in pass-fail course, not computed in grade point average, no credit earned.
W 0.0 points, withdrawn without penalty, not computed in grade point average. Given for withdrawal previous to withdrawal deadline, and for certain extenuating circumstances thereafter, such as illness.
I 0.0 points, incomplete, not computed in grade point average, (see policy on incomplete grades below)

Incomplete Grades

An incomplete grade given in any term (i.e., first and second semester, winterim, or summer) may become a failing grade if the work is not completed within three weeks after the end of the final examination period for that term, or by the time agreed to in writing between the instructor and student. Requests for extension of time to resolve an incomplete (I) grade will be approved only when the instructor is satisfied that circumstances prompting the request justify waiving this three-week policy. Instructors must inform the Registrar's Office if a change needs to be made to the original incomplete extension date. 

Final Examinations

Faculty policy requires a culminating experience, such as a final examination, paper or project, during the final exam week of a traditional term. In certain schools, faculty may offer final exam exemptions. Specific requirements for these exemptions are outlined on the syllabus for each course offering an exemption. If a final exam exemption is not mentioned on the syllabus, no exemption is available.

Individual Instruction/Independent Study/Guided Study

Students may be given the option of taking a course as Individual Instruction, Independent Study or Guided Study. Individual Instruction refers to a student taking a course that is regularly offered by the university and listed in the course catalog; however, the student has a valid reason to take the course individually.  In an Independent Study, a student who wishes to study a topic not addressed in an existing university course may collaborate with an instructor to design a unique course of study.  Further information and required forms are available on the CU Portal.

Guided Study may be offered by the university when a regularly-scheduled course cannot be run due to low student enrollment in that class.  

Winterim

Winterim offers students the opportunity either to explore topics not in their regular course of study or to take courses that are part of their Core, major, or minor programs. Students pay a reduced per-credit tuition for these three week January courses. Two or three credits are typical; four is the maximum permitted. 

Audit Policy

An audited class will appear on the transcript as a zero-grade point class with a grade of AU, and no credits earned. Students may sign up to audit a traditional class before the semester starts as long as there is room in the class. After the semester starts, students may change their registration status from enrolled for credit to audit up until the drop deadline. Students taking accelerated classes must register as an audit before the class starts. The university offers audits on a space-available basis, and programs/majors/instructors have the ability to disallow audits: such policies need to be stated in writing in program handbooks or on individual syllabi. Self-paced online classes cannot be audited.

A student who audits a course has access to the in-class (and/or online) didactic portions of the course. The student is expected to attend class, but the student is not required to participate in any of the course’s assessment activities, and the instructor is not required to assess the student’s progress in the course (that includes the formulation of a comprehensive assessment such as a course grade). The university does not require, expect, or allow the auditing student with a documented disability – other than a physical disability – to participate in its disability services process, as the students will not take part in the university’s course assessment.  Skills courses, such as foreign language, applied music, and some art courses are not available for audit. Students who audit a course will be charged a $75 per credit fee.

Change of Name or Address

Students are to promptly notify the Registrar's Office in writing of any change in name or address. It is critical that current contact information is on file for each student as important documents may be mailed to the student's name and address on file. 

Academic Honors

The Provost's Scholastic Honors List

The Provost's Scholastic Honors List for the University is composed each semester of those full-time students who have a semester grade point average of 3.6 or above. Students must earn at least 12 undergraduate credits in a semester to be eligible; graduate credits are not considered for this honor.

Graduation with Honors

  • A candidate who achieves a cumulative grade point average of 3.90 or better will be graduated Summa Cum Laude
  • One who achieves a cumulative grade point average of 3.80 or better will be graduated Magna Cum Laude
  • One who achieves a cumulative grade point average of 3.60 or better will be graduated Cum Laude

Awards

Concordia considers it right and proper to recognize through special awards unusual proficiency and performance in a certain area of learning as well as in worthwhile and purposeful co-curricular activity. Many such awards are given annually to students who have demonstrated exceptional achievement or who have made unusual contributions. From time to time, friends of Concordia have established such awards and have usually stipulated conditions under which the respective award should be given. Since in these instances the recognition aspect is more important than the financial element, Concordia has listed these as awards rather than scholarships. Such awards include:

  • American Bicentennial Award in Business
  • Walter W. Stuenkel Award
  • E .R . Brann Citizenship Award
  • Science Awards in Life Sciences, Mathematics, and Physical Sciences
  • Wilhelm Schickard Award in Computer Science
  • Moeller Award in English, German, Greek, Hebrew, Latin, and Spanish
  • Religion Award
  • Northup-Bartelt Memorial Music Award
  • Nightingale Nursing Award
  • Charles W. Finke Health and Human Performance Award
  • Marsha Konz Student Educator Award
  • Marsha Konz Graduate Educator Award
  • CUW Visual Arts Award
  • Søren Kierkegaard Philosophy Award
  • Zondervan Publishing House Award in Greek, Hebrew, and Theology

Academic Probation and Dismissal Policy for Undergraduate Students

In general, an undergraduate student is considered in good academic standing if s/he maintains a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher.  Academic standing is assessed at the end of each semester and must include at least two courses.  When a student’s cumulative grade point average dips below 2.0, s/he is placed on academic probation.  The student remains on probation if subsequent semester GPAs are 2.0 or above, but his/her cumulative GPA remains below 2.0.  However, if at any time on probation, the student’s semester GPA again dips below 2.0, s/he will be dismissed from the University.  In general, students must have a 2.0 GPA or higher in order to graduate.  It should be noted, however, that some undergraduate programs have their own standards for academic good standing and program completion, which work in conjunction with the aforementioned general standards.

Appeal Process

Post-Traditional Undergraduate Students 

Adult (center and online) students who are dismissed from the University and want to be readmitted have two options:

1. Appeal their dismissal immediately to be considered for readmission following the process below. The appeal will be granted or denied.

2. Appeal their dismissal later following the process below. The appeal will be granted or denied.

Students who are dismissed from the University must work with their Student Success Advisor to appeal their dismissal in writing. The appeal should include an explanation of what went wrong and a specific plan for improvement. The Lead Directors of Centers will then consult with any appropriate academic staff to offer a recommendation to the Assistant Vice President of Academics for Student Success.  The AVP of Academics for Student Success will then notify the student of their decision.  Stipulations may be attached to a favorable decision.  Students who lose their appeal must sit out at least one semester, after which they may re-apply for admission.  During the admission process, students will be required to work with their Student Success Advisor to appeal their dismissal in writing. Their re-application will be enhanced if they can demonstrate academic success at another school in the intervening period.

Traditional Undergraduate Students

Traditional undergraduate students who are dismissed from a particular academic program, but not from the University, may appeal their dismissal within the process established by their program. Students who are dismissed from their program and whose appeal was denied by their program may only appeal to the Provost's Office if they believe that their program’s appeal process was not properly followed. If that is the case, the student will present an argument in writing. The appropriate Chief Academic Officer (CAO) or designee will examine the request, and if s/he ascertains that due process was not followed, s/he may return the appeal to the program for reconsideration. This decision will be communicated to the student within 10 working days of receiving his/her request.

Students who are dismissed from the University may schedule an appeal with the Traditional Undergraduate Academic Appeals Committee (TUAAC) through the Provost's Office. In advance of their appeal appearance, students must send a letter to the Provost's Office that explains why they were not successful and what they plan to do to improve their academic performance should they be readmitted. In most cases, the TUAAC will render a decision immediately after meeting with the student.  Students who lose their appeal must sit out at least one semester, after which they may re-apply for admission. Their re-application will be enhanced if they can demonstrate academic success at another school in the intervening period. The TUAAC on the Mequon campus consists of the (who chairs the committee), the Registrar or designee, the Director of Center for Academic Advising and Career Engagement, the Director of the Academic Resource Center, a representative from Student Life, the student’s academic advisor, and one of the student’s instructors. The TUAAC on the Ann Arbor campus consists of the AVP of Academics (who chairs the committee), the Assistant Registrar, the Director of the Academic Resource Center, the Academic Support Specialist, the Dean of Students, the student’s academic advisor, and one of the student’s instructors.

Emerging Scholars Students

Emerging Scholar students who are dismissed from the University may appeal in writing to the Director of Emerging Scholars Program who, along with the Assistant Vice President of Academics for Student Success, will meet with the student and render an immediate decision.

All dismissed students may appeal a decision to the President of the University (if at Mequon) or to the Vice President of Administration (if at Ann Arbor) in writing within 5 working days of the decision only if they can demonstrate that due process was not followed.

Academic Ethics

Mutual respect and concern for one another in the atmosphere of a Christian caring community is the basic principle which should govern the relationship between student and instructor. Faculty are professional in their expectations of academic excellence and students respond with an appropriate level of effort and commitment. Unprofessional conduct and unethical behavioral are serious breaches of the academic contract. 

Academic Honesty

Academic honesty is the foundation of our education institution. Without it, we make a mockery of the academic endeavor and the ultimate rewards associated with a degree in higher education. At Concordia, honesty is central to our Christian identity and way of relating to one another. The names of students found guilty of engaging in academic dishonesty will be reported to the Provost's Office. Types of academic dishonesty can be defined in the following manner:

  • Cheating: includes, but is not limited to: a) the use of unauthorized assistance in taking any type of test or completing any type of classroom assignment; b) assisting another student in cheating on a test or class assignment, including impersonation of another student.
  • Plagiarism: includes, but is not limited to: a) failure to give full and clear acknowledgement of the source of any idea that is not your own; b) handing in the same assignment for two different courses without the consent of the instructors.
  • Fabrication: includes, but is not limited to: the forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University academic document, record, or instrument of instruction.
  • Academic misconduct: includes, but is not limited to: intentionally or recklessly interfering with teaching, research, and/or other academic functions.

Disciplinary Actions

  • First instance:  The faculty member determines the penalty. This may include any of the following:  an opportunity to redo the assignment or test, a reduced grade on the assignment or test, a failing grade on the assignment or test, a lower grade in the course, a failing grade in the course, or removal of the student from the course.

  • Second instance:  The faculty member determines the penalty, and the campus-specific Chief Academic Officer (CAO) or designee connects with the student at which time additional sanctions may be imposed.

  • Third instance: The faculty member determines the penalty, and the Academic Conduct Board meets with the student at which time additional sanctions may be imposed, including suspension or expulsion.  The Academic Conduct Board (ACB) consists of the CAO, Assistant Vice President of Academics, and the appropriate Dean. If the student is in an accelerated post-traditional program, the appropriate Center Director joins the ACB.  If the student is a graduate student, the appropriate Program Director joins the ACB.  

Appeal Process

Students may appeal a faculty-issued academic dishonesty decision or penalty in writing to the Dean of the School in which the course was offered within 15 working days of receiving the report. The Dean (in consultation with the Department Chair or Program Director or Center Director) will consider the appeal and render a decision within 10 working days of receiving the appeal and issue a written response to the student. 

Final Course Grade Appeal

Rights Concerning Grading Practices

The determination of grades is the responsibility of the course instructor. Instructors are required to inform students, through the course syllabus at the beginning of each semester, of the grading criteria for assignments and all grading policies.  Instructors must apply all grading criteria uniformly and in a timely manner. A final grade is defined as the grade recorded on the student's academic record by term for each course. Final grades submitted to the Registrar’s Office are presumed to be accurate and final.

Grounds For A Final Course Grade Appeal

Students and faculty should make every effort to resolve questions about grades without seeking a grade appeal. A Final Course Grade Appeal is a last resort and should be pursued only if evidence exists that the student’s final grade does not accurately reflect the grading policy.  The responsibility for developing and presenting the case for changing a grade rests with the student making the appeal. In addition, depending on the nature of the appeal, a final grade appeal may involve re-examination of all components that constitute the final grade.

Procedure For Final Course Grade Appeal

This procedure involves specific deadlines for pursuing an appeal. Students are required to follow the steps and timeline outlined within this procedure. At any step in the appeal process, issues presented past the deadlines will not be considered.

The steps listed below are to be carried out by all parties with an attitude of Christian love and concern for academic, moral, and spiritual growth. Face-to-face meetings are expected throughout the process, but may not be possible depending on the specific circumstances. In such cases, a phone call or other real-time conversation may be substituted. All parties will be expected to act in a professional and civil manner and make good-faith attempts to resolve the grievance.

Step 1: The student must take the appeal, in writing, to the instructor no later than sixty (60) calendar days after the final grade is posted on the transcript. The instructor has ten (10) business days of receiving the appeal to respond to the student, in writing.  If the issue is rectified, or the student is satisfied in this meeting with the instructor, the matter is settled. The dean of the school in which the class is offered has the authority to extend the deadline for an appeal due to extenuating circumstances.

Step 2: If the student is dissatisfied with the instructor's response to the appeal, the student may take an appeal to the chair of the department in which the instructor involved is a member. If the instructor is one of these officials, the appeal should be made to the instructor’s immediate supervisor. This appeal must be brought within ten (10) business days of the unsatisfactory response to the initial statement of appeal. The student must provide, in writing, relevant evidence that supports the argument that the final grade was assigned incorrectly, based on the criteria established in the Grounds for Final Course Grade Appeal section.

The department chair will review the material submitted by the student. The reviewer may choose to meet individually with the student and the faculty member, or may choose to meet together, in an attempt to resolve the grade.

The reviewer’s decision will be given to the student in writing within ten (10) business days of receiving the student’s appeal, and a written record of the decision and its basis must be kept by the chair and shared with the instructor. The chair must confine the grade analysis to the fidelity of the scoring as presented in the syllabus, along with the published grade scale and other pertinent information, and not rescore assessments as he/she wishes. The decision of the department chair is final.

General Student Grievances

Concordia University is committed to providing students with an avenue to express concerns and to work with CU officials toward amicable resolutions. CU believes engaging in this process can also be an inherently valuable educational experience for students and can help prepare students to address issues in a professional and productive manner after they leave CU.

Grievances applicable under this policy:

  • Arbitrary and/or capricious actions by a college employee or administrative office that caused demonstrable harm to a student;
  • Policy or procedure applied unfairly and/or in a different manner than it was applied to others in like circumstances; or
  • Administrative error in the application of a policy or procedure.

Grievances not applicable under this policy (but which may be covered under other existing policies):

  • Accessibility services (e.g., student accommodations through the ARC);
  • Final grade appeals;
  • Academic misconduct;
  • The Code of Student Conduct and the conduct system;
  • Title IX (e.g., sexual harassment);
  • Residence Life;
  • Parking tickets;
  • Financial debt to the University;
  • Financial Aid appeals; and
  • University-wide requirements (e.g., student fees).

The steps listed below shall be carried out by all parties with an attitude of Christian love and concern for academic, moral, and spiritual growth.  Face-to-face meetings are expected throughout the process, but may not be possible depending on the specific circumstances. All parties will be expected to act in a professional and civil manner and make good-faith attempts to resolve the grievance in the spirit of Matthew 18.

General Grievance Procedure

There are specific deadlines for pursuing a grievance. Students are required to follow the steps and timeline outlined within this procedure. At any step in the grievance procedure, issues presented past the deadlines will not be considered.

CU is committed to the Peacemakers model of conflict resolution (i.e., Biblical reconciliation). Peacemakers encourages all parties to discuss conflicts in person, when possible. Therefore, when a student does not feel comfortable directly confronting the alleged, the student is encouraged to schedule a “coaching session” with our Director of Counseling or his/her designee to help prepare the student for the conversation. The Assistant Vice President of Academics (for academic grievances) and the Dean of Students (for non-academic grievances) may also serve as resources for the grievance process.

Informal Resolution

Step 1: Student complaints should first be communicated to the appropriate person[1] to resolve the matter informally. Resolution of a majority of complaints can likely be resolved at this informal level. This communication must take place within ten (10) business days of the alleged injustice. If the complaint is resolved, or the student is satisfied with the outcome of this meeting, the matter is settled. If resolution does not occur, the student may elect to file a formal grievance.

Formal Resolution

Step 2: Within ten (10) business days of the informal resolution attempt, a student may present the grievance in writing to the chair or director (or the dean if the complaint involves a chair or director), who hereinafter is referred to as the University Official, of the department or area where the person alleged to have caused the grievance is employed. The student shall include the following elements in his/her written grievance:

  • a clear description of the incident(s) and the parties involved;
  • a chronological timeline of all relevant communications and events;
  • the efforts taken to resolve the matter (e.g., Informal Resolution);
  • a list of potential witnesses (e.g., someone who overheard a conversation or observed something);
  • the outcome being sought.

The student may use the help of an advisor or support person but the student must be the sole author of the document. The University Official will conduct an inquiry, gathering additional information if needed. Following this, the University Official will issue a formal written response within ten (10) business days of receiving the written grievance. If the student is satisfied, the matter is settled.

Step 3: If the student is dissatisfied with the decision regarding the grievance rendered by the individual at step 2, he/she may grieve the decision within ten (10) business days of the unsatisfactory decision to the supervising vice president (non-academic) or dean (academic). This grievance must be in writing, include the same elements described above, and also must indicate why a grievance should be heard.

The vice president/dean will review the documentation, may request a meeting with one or both parties, and will issue a decision within ten (10) business days of receiving the written grievance. Decisions at this level are final.

Who may file a grievance under this policy? Any student who is admitted, enrolled, or registered for study at the University for any academic period and/or those who may attend other educational institutions and reside in a University residence hall or attend University classes. The full definition of a student is listed in the Code of Student Conduct. Please note that third parties (e.g., parents, faculty) are not allowed to file a grievance on behalf of a student under this policy.

Utilizing an Advisor. The University encourages the student to create a support network with an advisor. The advisor may be a member of the campus community or a family member of the student. The advisor may not make a presentation, speak on behalf of the student, or write the documentation. During any meetings, the student and advisor may speak quietly, request a short break to talk, or communicate in writing.

Sanctions/Consequences. Please note that any administrative actions or decisions imposed on a student stand until “overturned” in any of the steps listed above. For example, a student who has been dismissed from an athletic team remains dismissed until otherwise determined by the University. 

Retaliation Prohibited. Retaliation against a complainant (i.e., student) or witness involved in the investigation is prohibited. Retaliation may be an implicit or explicit act (e.g., intimidation, hostility). The University will investigate any reports of retaliation and take appropriate action.

Privacy. All communications and investigative actions related to a grievance will be treated with as much privacy as possible without compromising the thoroughness and fairness of the process. Confidentiality cannot be guaranteed.

[1] Typically, the appropriate person in Step 1 is the person who has allegedly violated the student’s rights. In some instances, the appropriate person could be the direct supervisor of the alleged.

Transcripts

An official transcript bears the seal of the University and the signature of the Registrar or his/her representative. Official transcripts may be given to students or alumni or can be mailed directly to institutions or persons considering the applicant for admission or for employment.

An unofficial transcript is given to the student whose credits are listed thereon and is marked unofficial. Concordia University accepts no responsibility for the accuracy of an unofficial transcript after it has been issued.

Federal regulations require the student’s signature before the transcript record can be released. You can access the transcript request form by visiting the Registrar's Office page on our university websites. Transcripts will not be released for students who have a financial hold due to an outstanding balance. 

Graduation

Associate 

Concordia University confers the degree of Associate in Arts on a student of good character who has met the following requirements:

  1. a cumulative minimum grade point average of 2.00 for all academic credit earned at Concordia University;
  2. satisfied any program-specific requirements; and
  3. met all financial obligations to the University.

Bachelor 

Concordia University confers the degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, or Bachelor of Social Work on a student of good character who has met the following requirements:

  1. accumulated a cumulative minimum grade point average of 2.00 for all academic credit earned at Concordia University;
  2. satisfied all program-specific requirements; and
  3. met all financial obligations to the University.

Doctoral/Master

Concordia University confers the doctoral and master's degrees on a student of good character who has met the following requirements:

  1. accumulated a cumulative minimum grade point average of 3.00 for all academic credit earned at Concordia University;
  2. satisfied all program-specific requirements; and
  3. met all financial obligations to the University.

Graduation Application

Each candidate for graduation must complete a Graduation Application online by the assigned deadline, prior to commencement.

Graduation Fee

A fee is assessed for all graduates to cover graduation expenses. The graduation fee is required of all students, whether or not they attend commencement.

Commencement Participation

In order to participate in commencement, the student must have:

  • completed all coursework toward the degree (or be in the process of taking the final class);
  • completed the Graduation Application; and
  • paid the graduation fee.

Change of Enrollment

Adding a Course

Face-to-Face Courses, Traditional Semester

Students may add a face-to-face course before no more than 15% of the scheduled class periods have occurred. After the first week of class, consent of the instructor must also be obtained on the schedule change form to add a course.

Face-to-Face, Non-Traditional Terms

Students may add a course up to the end of the first week of class.

Online Courses, 16 Week Semester and Non-Traditional 

Students may add an online self-paced course up to eight weeks prior to the class end date. Students may add an online collaborative course up to the end of the first week of class.

Online Courses, Non-Traditional Terms, 8 week courses

Students may add an online collaborative or self-paced course up to the end of the first week of class.

All Courses: Please note, students administratively withdrawn from a course due to excessive absences may not re-enroll in the same course during the same term or semester.  

Dropping a Course

Students may request to drop a course at any point in the term; however, the timing of when a student drops has both academic and financial implications. A course must be dropped prior to 2/3 completion of the course in order for it to be listed as a withdraw ("W" grade) on the transcript. Courses dropped after this point are no longer eligible for a withdraw and will receive the letter grade earned. Online self-paced courses dropped after 2/3 completion will be a 0% refund and the student will receive the letter grade earned, regardless of the number of assignments completed. 

Students must meet with their academic advisor and financial aid counselor prior to making changes as dropping a course may have ramifications for student status, financial aid eligibility, athletic eligibility, or program progression. Please see the Refund Policies for details regarding the potential academic and financial implications of dropping a course.

Administrative Drop from a Course

The University reserves the right to administratively drop a student from a course. An administrative drop may occur for one of the following:

  • Failure to begin the course in the allotted time frame;
  • Failure to comply with attendance policies;
  • Disciplinary reasons (i.e. academic dishonesty).

If dropped, the student is responsible for any academic, financial, or athletic consequences that may result. Please see the Refund Policies for details regarding the potential academic and financial implications of being administratively dropped from a course.

Withdrawal from the University

Students who wish to cease coursework and withdraw completely from the University must notify their academic advisor and financial aid counselor prior to making changes as withdrawing from the institution may have implications for student status, financial aid, and future athletic eligibility or program progression.

If active in coursework at the time of the withdraw, the student will be removed from all coursework and last date of attendance will be used to determine course grades and financial responsibility following the Refund Policies. Prior to a withdraw being fully processed, any outstanding balance must be paid in full. Should a student wish to return to his/her program at a later time, he/she must reapply for University admission.

Students who are inactive from coursework for two consecutive semesters, and who have not notified the University of their intention to take a stop out, will be withdrawn from the University for inactivity. Students will be required to reapply to the University if they wish to resume coursework.

Medical Withdrawal

Students who are seriously injured/ill and cannot continue in coursework due to medical necessity may be eligible for a medical withdrawal. Students must contact their academic advisor to request a withdrawal and discuss the extenuating circumstances. Medical documentation must be provided within 30 days of the student’s notification of withdrawal. Medical documentation will be reviewed by the Provost’s Office.  

If a medical withdrawal is authorized, the last date of attendance will be used to determine financial responsibility following the Refund Policy. The student will receive a “W” in all active courses. If a medical withdrawal is not authorized, tuition, room and board responsibility and a grade for courses will follow the Refund Policies. Prior to returning following a medical withdrawal, students must reapply to the University and complete a Health and Wellness Meeting. Students will not be authorized for a medical withdrawal more than once during their enrollment at CU.

Temporary Stop Out from the University

Students who wish to temporarily cease coursework, but plan to register in the future, may request a temporary stop out for up to two semesters after the conclusion of a term. Students must contact their academic advisor and financial aid counselor prior to requesting a stop out, as stopping out of coursework may have implications for student status, financial aid eligibility, athletic eligibility, or program progression.

Prior to returning to coursework, the student may be required to reapply to his/her program. Students who do not return to the University within two consecutive semesters must reapply to the University. Students required to reapply will be subject to the program requirements and policies under the current academic catalog.

Experiential Learning Policy

An experiential learning activity is a single, off-campus educational/instructional experience provided by CU faculty/staff to their students which normally involves travel for the group. The Experiential Learning Policy does not include internships, clinical experiences, fieldwork experiences, or practicums. Policy regarding participation in such experiences are determined by individual departments. 

University experiential learning expands student learning, knowledge and understanding of a subject and adds realism to the topic of study through active hands-on experience with the rich resources of the local community. Students can expect the following with regard to experiential learning in their courses:

  • All required academic experiential learning will be linked to the course objectives and objectives for student learning during the experiential learning activity will be identified in the syllabus.
  • All required academic experiential learning will be clearly identified as such in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term, with detailed information about date, time, locations, means of transportation, and any fees for which the student is responsible. If an unforeseen educational opportunity arises later in the term, as soon as possible the faculty member will discuss it with the class. In that case, such a trip cannot be required of all students.
  • Faculty will work to schedule the experiential learning activity during their regularly-scheduled class session or during a time that causes the least disruption to other courses whenever possible (e.g. weekends or late afternoon/evenings for traditional undergraduates, alternate weeks for blended courses).
  • In order to ensure that students with disabilities have equal access to experiential learning activities, faculty members will review student accommodations provided by the ARC and work closely with the student to ensure accommodations can be provided during the experiential learning activity. Students who have concerns about access to the experiential learning activity should discuss their concerns with the Academic Resource Center Director.
  • Either the faculty member or some other responsible University official designated by the faculty member will accompany students to all academic experiential learning activities.
  • All faculty will be notified of students participating in an experiential learning activity via email to excuse the participating students from class.
  • Students are expected to notify faculty of other courses at least three days ahead of time that they will be absent and/or miss required assignments due to an experiential learning activity.

Class Attendance

Class attendance is very important, not only to the instructor and the individual student, but also to the entire campus community. Students can expect faculty to have a clear attendance policy in each course syllabus. Students are expected to be aware of the attendance policy in each course for which they are enrolled.

Attendance Definition

Depending on the course delivery, attendance is defined as seated time in the class (face-to-face courses), an assignment submission (online courses), and/or time present for live video conferencing with the instructor (videoconference courses).

Unexcused/Excused Absences

For known attendance conflicts, students must contact their instructor in advance of the class session to notify him/her of the absence. In general, acceptable reasons for student absence from or failure to participate in class include:

  • Participation as a representative of the University in a scheduled intercollegiate athletic event;
  • Participation as a representative of the University in a scheduled professional/academic conference, academic competition or performance, or a experiential learning activity scheduled as part of a course;
  • Participation as an officer of a University co-curricular organization in a scheduled conference for which participation is mandatory for the student (e.g., a required annual meeting for all presidents of a national student organization);
  • Health-related absences for which valid documentation is presented;
  • Accommodation-related absences for which documentation is provided through the Academic Resource Center;
  • Death in the family;
  • Military commitments;
  • Other situations not specifically noted in this list, but approved by the Assistant Vice President of Academics and/or the dean of the school in which the student is enrolled.

Students may be required to submit documentation of absences to faculty members. Students shall be permitted a reasonable amount of time to make up the material or activities covered if their absence was excused by the instructor.

No-Show/Never Attend

Students are considered a no-show if they do not attend or participate within the required timeline of a course or laboratory in which they are registered, and they have not contacted the instructor to indicate their intent. The university reserves the right to assess a fee for failure to begin.

  • Students will be dropped when they have failed to begin or never attended a course within the first two weeks for courses 8 weeks or longer.
  • Students will be dropped when they have failed to begin or never attended a course within the first week for courses that are less than 8 weeks.

Excessive Student Absence

Concordia University reserves the right to administratively withdraw a student from class for excessive, unexcused absences based on the thresholds articulated below. The chart below documents when a student meets excessive absences (defined as approximately 15% of the course).

An instructor may submit a request for an administrative withdraw if the student’s last day of attendance was prior to the withdrawal deadline. If administratively withdrawn for excessive absence, the Registrar will assign the grade of "W" if the student’s last date of attendance was prior to the withdrawal deadline. A student who participated in a course past the withdrawal deadline, but who reaches an excessive absence threshold, is not eligible for a withdrawal and will be assessed a final grade.

When administratively withdrawn, the Registrar will assign the grade of "W". A student participating in a course past the withdrawal deadline is not eligible for a withdrawal and will be assessed a final grade.

Consequences of Excessive Absences

An administrative withdrawal due to excessive absences may impact a student's scholarships, athletic eligibility, federal financial aid, and his/her ability to live in Concordia University Residence Halls. Residence Life requires that students maintain full-time status to live in Residence Halls. The Cashier’s Office will implement applicable provisions of the Refund Policy when a student is administratively withdrawn, and Financial Aid will take appropriate action under applicable polices related to student aid.

Course Duration Course Delivery Type Excessive Abscence
16 weeks Face-to-face (Traditional) & Videoconference 7 or more hours of class
16 weeks Online No assignment submissions for 3 or more total weeks online
12 weeks Face-to-face (Extended Campus) & Videoconference Three of more 4-hour class sessions
12 weeks Online No assignment submissions for 3 or more total weeks online
10 weeks Face-to-face (Traditional) & Videoconference 7 or more hours of class
10 weeks Face-to-face (Extended Campus) & Videoconference Three or more 4-hour class sessions
10 weeks Online No assignment submissions for 3 or more total weeks online
8 weeks Face-to-face (Traditional) & Videoconference 7 or more hours of class
8 weeks Face-to-face (Extended Campus) & Videoconference Two or more 4-hour class sessions
8 weeks Online No assignment submissions for 2 or more total weeks online
7 weeks Face-to-face (Traditional) 2 or more hours of class
6 weeks Face-to-face (Extended Campus) & Videoconference Two or more 4-hour class sessions
6 weeks Online No assignment submissions for 1 or more total weeks online
4 weeks Online No assignment submissions for 1 or more total weeks online
3 weeks Face-to-face (traditional) & Videoconference 7 or more hours of class