Physical Therapy-Doctorate (DPT)

DPT 500. Foundations of Physical Therapy. (3 Credits)

Foundations of Physical Therapy introduces students to issues related to the profession of Physical Therapy and to basic examination and patient care skills. It examines the legal aspects of practice, supervision of support personnel, and relationships with other health care professionals. Students are provided with laboratory opportunities that allow them to develop effective communication with patients, personal and patient safety, and basic mobility skills. Special emphasis is placed on learning the principles and techniques of measuring and documenting joint motion, muscle strength and posture. Pre-requisites: Admission to Concordia University’s DPT program.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 501. Human Anatomy I. (3 Credits)

Human Anatomy I is an integrated approach to the gross anatomy of the human body, with particular emphasis on the muscles, bones, joints, vasculature, and nerves of the upper extremity. The laboratory portion of the course includes cadaveric dissection and examination of prosected human cadavers. Human anatomy is part of the professional Physical Therapy curriculum. As such, this course helps students develop their knowledge and understanding of the structure and function of the human body, and to prepare them for service as physical therapy professionals.

Prerequisites: Admission to the CUW Doctor of Physical Therapy Program, or consent of instructor.

DPT 502. Human Anatomy II. (3 Credits)

Human Anatomy II is an integrated approach to the gross anatomy of the human body, with particular emphasis on the muscles, bones, joints, vasculature, and nerves of the axial region (trunk, neck, skull, and face) and the lower extremity. Consideration will also be given to the study of cells, tissues, and organ systems. Concepts learned in Human Anatomy I will be incorporated throughout the course. The laboratory portion of the course includes cadaveric dissection and examination of prosected human cadavers. Human anatomy is part of the professional Physical Therapy curriculum. As such, this course helps students develop their knowledge and understanding of the structure and function of the human body, and to prepare them for service as physical therapy professionals. Course

Prerequisites: Matriculation in the CUW Doctor of Physical Therapy Program and successful completion of Human Anatomy I, or consent of instructor.

DPT 505. Kinesiology. (5 Credits)

Kinesiology is a foundation course that examines and analyzes human motion. Basic principles of osteokinematics, arthrokinematics, kinetics, levers, and moments are covered. Muscle mechanics and neural control of muscles and joints are also introduced. All joints of the extremities and the spine are then discussed with application of these principles. The concepts of joint dysfunction and muscle imbalance as related to clinical evaluation and treatment are introduced.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 510. Evidence Based Practice I. (2 Credits)

This course provides students with an opportunity to develop skills that are fundamental to making informed clinical decisions based upon the best available evidence. Students will learn the steps involved in making evidence-based decisions, use multiple resources to acquire published evidence, and develop the ability to understand basic statistics reported in the literature. Furthermore, basic concepts of measurement reliability and validity will be covered, including measurements made by observation of movement. Students will learn to make specific measurements germane to the practice of physical therapy and will understand concepts of reliability and validity as they apply to these measures.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 540. Clinical Decision Making. (2 Credits)

This course provides an opportunity for students to practice the thought process used by physical therapists in making clinical decisions regarding patient care. The students will be given a framework by which to begin the clinical decision making process, including screening for medical referral and appropriateness of continuing with a physical therapy examination. This framework for decision making will be implemented into all courses within the curriculum. Students will gain additional experience with patient examination with emphasis on the subjective interview, evaluating examination data, developing a Physical Therapy diagnosis and prognosis, and practicing documentation of these findings within a SOAP note format. By the end of this course, students will be better able to demonstrate the ability to perform an effective subjective examination and identify patients that are appropriate either for continuation with a physical therapy examination or referral to another healthcare provider. Pre-requisites: Successful completion of Semesters 1 and 2 in the Concordia University Wisconsin DPT curriculum.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 550. Pathophysiology/Pharmacol I. (4 Credits)

Pathophysiology is the study of human physiologic function in disease. It examines the etiology, morphology and pathogenesis of human disease with correlations to clinical manifestations and treatment regimes. Pathological processes are addressed on both a structural and functional level. Sufficient review of basic scientific foundations is included to promote their application to pathophysiologic concepts. Special emphasis is placed on cellular and subcellular mechanisms which have broad applicability to pathophysiology of all organ systems, and specific organ systems including hematologic, cardiovascular and respiratory. Pediatric and aging concepts are also considered. Pharmacology will be introduced and drugs will subsequently be classified according to their approved therapeutic uses. Tutorial group sessions will be used for problem-based learning. This will include the use of acquired knowledge and skills to recognize, develop and demonstrate qualities required to assume the role of a health care provider, including responsibility to a team as well as communication and leadership skills, and to effectively promote the learning process.

Prerequisites: Anatomy (BIO 550) Physiology (BIO 470)

DPT 555. Movement Analysis I. (1 Credit)

Movement Analysis I provides students with fundamental knowledge and skill required to understand and perform functional, biomechanical, and observational analysis of normal human locomotion.

Prerequisites: Good standing in CUW DPT program or consent of instructor.

DPT 560. Intro to Professional Practice. (2 Credits)

This course introduces students to the profession of physical therapy, the role of the physical therapist within the healthcare team, relevant aspects of the practice environment and professional development.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 565. Therapeutic Exercise. (3 Credits)

This course provides students with basic concepts and principles that guide the development of appropriate therapeutic exercise interventions for patients/clients across the lifespan. Pre-requisites: Successful completion of Foundations of Physical Therapy, Anatomy, Kinesiology, Pathology/Pharmacology I, and Clinical Decision Making.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 575. Community Practice I. (1 Credit)

The Community Practice course will provide the student with opportunities to integrate current professional and personal knowledge, attitudes, and skills into service activities performed in various community settings. The focus will be on the provision of service which positively impacts the health and wellness of defined community populations. Sections of the course will occur in every fall and spring semester of the Physical Therapy curriculum beginning in the spring semester of year one.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 580. Mgmt Pediatric Disorders. (4 Credits)

Management of Pediatric Disorders is the first course in a three-semester sequence addressing evaluation and treatment of clients with primary neurological diagnoses. Other common pediatric diagnoses managed by physical therapy will also be discussed. Students are provided opportunity to expand clinical decision-making skills within the context of physical therapy management of children with congenital and acquired impairments. The psychosocial aspects of disability will be addressed as they relate to the management of client support systems, environmental modification, and community integration/reintegration.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 584. Neuroscience I. (1 Credit)

Introduction to Neuroscience is an integrated approach to neuroscience with an emphasis on cellular level anatomy and physiology. The course will incorporate an overview of the major regions and divisions of the nervous system, and will cover neurons and glial cells, information transmission including synaptic transmission, nervous system development, the ventricular system, meninges and connective tissues, neuroplasticity, and aging. The impact of injury or disease affecting these aspects of the nervous system will also be covered. The lab/discussion portion of the course includes activities designed to integrate the neurological concepts from the lectures and readings, including the examination of cadaveric prosections of the nervous system and meninges. This course helps students begin to develop their knowledge and understanding of the structure and function of the human nervous system and the impact of injury or illness on movement and function.

Prerequisites: Admission into the CUW Doctor of Physical Therapy Program, or consent of instructor.

DPT 585. Neuroscience II. (2 Credits)

Neuroscience II is an integrated approach to the principles of human nervous system structure and function, with an emphasis on the peripheral and spinal regions. The anatomy of these regions and the vascular supply of the spinal cord, as well as spinal reflexes and circuits will be described. The course will include discussion of somatosensory and motor (somatic and autonomic) pathways of the limbs, trunk, and face, as well as spinal level circuits and reflexes, and their interactions. The impact of injury or disease affecting the peripheral and spinal regions will also be covered. Concepts learned in Neuroscience I will be incorporated throughout the course. The laboratory/discussion portion of the course includes gross examination of the human spinal cord, the surrounding connective tissues, and nerve roots; as well as activities designed to integrate neurological concepts of these regions. This course helps students develop their knowledge and understanding of the structure and function of the spinal and peripheral regions of the human nervous system and the impact of injury or illness on movement and function. Pre-requisites: Successful completion of previous course work in the DPT curriculum.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 586. Neuroscience III. (2 Credits)

Neuroscience III is an integrated approach to the principles of human nervous system structure and function; with an emphasis on the brainstem, cerebellum, and cerebrum. The anatomy of these regions and their vascular supply, as well as their functional components will be described. The course will cover somatosensory, motor (somatic and autonomic), limbic, cognitive, vestibular, and special sensory systems and their interactions along with detailed discussion of the cranial nerves. The impact of injury or disease affecting these regions of the nervous system will also be covered. Concepts learned in Neuroscience I and Neuroscience II will be incorporated throughout the course. The laboratory/discussion portion of the course includes gross examination of the human brain and brainstem, its surrounding connective tissues and blood vessels, and cranial nerves; as well as activities designed to integrate neurological concepts. This course helps students develop their knowledge and understanding of the structure and function of the human nervous system and the impact of injury or illness on movement and function. Pre-requisites: Successful completion of previous coursework in DPT curriculum.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 602. Community Clinic I. (1 Credit)

DPT 609. Exercise Science I. (3 Credits)

Exercise Science provides students with the basic concepts and principles that guide the development of comprehensive physical therapy patient/client management. The course emphasizes adaptations brought on by acute and chronic exercise in both normal and abnormal physiological systems. Pre-requisites: The successful completion of previous coursework in the DPT curriculum.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 610. Management of Neuromuscular Disorders I. (3 Credits)

Management of Neuromuscular Disorders I will introduce students to the basic concepts of neuro rehab that are not specific to specific medical diagnoses. This course will include the neuro exam, introduction to basic techniques like neural facilitation and inhibition, and common tests, measures, and interventions for postural control, reach and grasp, and mobility. Movement system diagnoses will be included and applied to cases.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 611. Management of Neuromuscular Disorders-Adult. (3 Credits)

This course presents therapeutic intervention from a human movement perspective, emphasizing principles introduced in DPT 615 Movement Science and DPT 610 Management of Neuromuscular Disorders - Pediatric. Students are provided with opportunities to expand clinical decision-making skills in the physical therapy management of adults with acquired central nervous system dysfunction.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 612. Community Clinic II. (1 Credit)

DPT 615. Movement Science. (4 Credits)

Movement Science exposes students to current theory in motor control, motor learning, and motor development. The course reviews the processes and constraints that define acquisition, retention, and change of motor behavior across the lifespan. Students will be exposed to tools used to examine and describe movement in a clinical setting. The course is designed around four main topics: postural control, control of mobility, control of reach and grasp, and motor learning.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 625. Therapeutic Modalities. (4 Credits)

This course teaches the use of biophysical agents / modalities in physical therapy practice from a physiological perspective. Students will learn to use modalities for inflammation control, tissue repair and healing, strengthening, motor control and pain management. Students will learn to incorporate the use of all categories of biophysical agents including thermal, mechanical, and electromagnetic (electromagnetic fields and electric currents) into a safe physical therapy plan of care and appropriately document their use.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of the previous semesters of the DPT curriculum.

DPT 628. Clinical Problem Solving I. (2 Credits)

This 3-week clinical experience is the first in a three-course sequence of clinical decision making experiences completed in the clinical environment. This course expands upon the clinical decision making skills introduced in the academic setting in semester one. The teaching model for this experience is a structured model which may be collaborative (2 or 3 students with one clinical instructor). Pre-requisites: Limited to students in good standing in the Physical Therapy Program; participation in mandatory orientation sessions; successful completion of all courses in semester.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 630. Clinical Problem Solving II. (2 Credits)

This 3-week clinical experience is the second in a three-course sequence of clinical decision making experiences, completed in pediatric clinical environments in the United States. Students are provided the opportunity to integrate academic course work in normal motor development and rehabilitation of children with developmental challenges with clinical practice. This clinical experience serves as an introduction to pediatric clinical practice.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 631. Clinical Problem Solving III. (6 Credits)

This 10-week clinical experience is the final course in the integrated clinical experiences, and the first longer-length clinical exposure for the students. The course follows the two-course sequence in management of the client with neuromuscular dysfunction and the three-course sequence in management of the client with musculoskeletal dysfunction. It is designed to integrate academic coursework in rehabilitation of adults with neurological and/or musculoskeletal dysfunction with clinical practice. Pre-requisites: Limited to student in good standing in the Physical Therapy Program; participation in all mandatory orientation sessions.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 635. Evidence Based Practice II. (3 Credits)

This course provides students with an opportunity to refine and expand upon what was learned in DPT 510 Evidence Based Practice I. Students will continue to gain knowledge and refine skills that are fundamental to making relevant clinical decisions based upon the best available evidence. Students will develop patient-specific foreground questions, acquire research articles, appraise the quality of the evidence, and make a clinical decision regarding the patient. Statistical concepts and principles essential for interpreting research evidence will be explored. Students will develop a searchable foreground question based upon a personal experience with a patient, acquire evidence to answer it, appraise the evidence, and articulate the answer to the question contrasting the relative strengths and limitations of the available evidence.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 650. Pathophysiology/Pharm II. (4 Credits)

This course is the second in a two-course sequence that studies human physiologic functions in disease. It examines the etiology, morphology and pathogenesis of human disease with correlations to clinical manifestations and treatment regimes. Pathological processes are addressed on both a structural and functional level. Sufficient review of basic scientific foundations is included to promote their application to pathophysiologic concepts. Special emphasis is placed on specific organ systems including integumentary, musculoskeletal, neurologic, endocrine, renal/urologic, and digestive. Pediatric and aging concepts are also considered. Pharmacology relevant to these systems will be discussed and drugs will subsequently be classified according to their approved therapeutic uses.

Prerequisites: DPT 550.

DPT 655. Movement Analysis II. (3 Credits)

Movement Analysis II provides students with fundamental knowledge and skill required to understand and perform functional, biomechanical, and observational analysis of pathological human movement. The course develops student skill in observational analysis, integration of data into a physical therapy evaluation, and performing ergonomic assessments, and provides an understanding of the principles, prescription, and management of individuals requiring an UE or LE orthoses and prosthesis.

Prerequisites: Good standing in CUW DPT program or consent of instructors.

DPT 659. Intro to Manage of Muscul Diso. (2 Credits)

Management of Musculoskeletal Disorders develops the skills required to perform a musculoskeletal examination/evaluation, determine the movement dysfunction and formulate, implement and modify an intervention plan. The first semester of the sequence emphasizes examination/evaluation principles, systems review (medical screening), and the theories and techniques of mobilization. These principles will be incorporated into examination and intervention of the various joint complexes in the next two musculoskeletal courses. Students will be responsible for knowing muscle innervations, origins and insertions and components of a neurologic examination.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 660. Manag of MuscSkel Dis I. (4 Credits)

Management of Musculoskeletal Disorders I develops the skills required to perform a musculoskeletal examination/evaluation, determine the movement dysfunction and formulate, implement and modify a treatment intervention plan for the lumbar spine, pelvis and lower extremities. The second semester of the sequence emphasizes examination techniques, soft tissue mobilization and exercise progression. The principles of examination/evaluation, systems review (medical screening), and the theories and techniques of mobilization and massage will be incorporated into examination/evaluation and treatment intervention for the lumbar spine, pelvis and lower extremity dysfunction. The student is expected to apply previous knowledge and skills. Each student will also be responsible for performing manual muscle testing and goniometry to the spine and extremities. A component of the course involves examination, evaluation and intervention of clients with lower quadrant musculoskeletal problems.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 661. Manag of MuscSkel Disorders II. (4 Credits)

Management of Musculoskeletal Disorders II develops the skills required to perform a musculoskeletal examination/evaluation, determine the movement dysfunction and formulate, implement and modify an intervention plan. The second semester of the sequence utilizes the principles of examination/evaluation, systems review (medical screening), and the theories and techniques of mobilization and massage which are incorporated into examination and intervention of the temporomandibular joint, cervical and thoracic spine, shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hand. You will be responsible for the previous knowledge of muscle innervations, origins and insertions, and components of a neurologic examination. You will also be responsible for performing manual muscle testing and goniometry to the spine and extremities. A component of the course involves examination, evaluation and intervention of clients with upper quadrant musculoskeletal problems.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 665. Manag of Integument Sys Disord. (2 Credits)

This course provides students with knowledge and skills required for physical therapy management of patients with disorders of the integumentary system. This course is being presented in a blended format where lectures will be available online and in-class learning activities will focus on hands-on LAB techniques, patient case applications, and discussions relevant to online content. Guest speakers will present their content in the form of lecture/LAB relevant to their specialty area. Students will learn the basic physiology of wound healing, how to perform comprehensive screens and examinations of the integumentary system, develop a plan of care, and acquire knowledge of specific types of wounds and burns. Universal precautions, wound prevention, and safety will be emphasized throughout the course. Students will be introduced to interventions that require additional post-professional training, including sharp debridement. Discussion will also take place in regards to physical therapy practice patterns when a patient should or should not be delegated to a physical therapist assistant or referred to another healthcare provider. Pre-requisites include successful completion of prior coursework in the DPT curriculum.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 675. Topics in Orthopedic Manual PT. (3 Credits)

This course will expand on the application of entry level concepts, techniques, and motor skills required to perform safe and efficient musculoskeletal examinations and evidence-based manual therapy interventions for the lumbar, thoracic, and cervical spine, pelvis, and extermities. Participants will refine examination techniques and discuss best practice guidelines for the application of manual therapy interventions, exercise progressions, and pain neuroscience education principles. Participants will be required to demonstrate proficiency with essential skills in examination and intervention domains.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 676. Topics in Sports Medicine PT. (3 Credits)

This lecture/ lab course is intended to expand the student understanding of higher-level movement disorders encountered in Orthopedic and Sports Physical Therapy. Movement disorders will be analyzed through a variety of evaluative methods. Sport-specific interventions will be discussed for prevention and return to sport.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 680. Community Practice II. (1 Credit)

This Community Practice course will provide the student with opportunities to integrate current professional and personal knowledge, attitudes and skills into service activities performed in various community settings and into inter-professional learning activities. The provision of service will focus on service which positively impacts the health and wellness of defined community populations. Sections of the course will occur in every fall and spring semester of the Physical Therapy curriculum beginning in the spring semester of year one.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 685. Community Practice III. (1 Credit)

The Community Practice course will provide the student with opportunities to integrate current professional and personal knowledge, attitudes and skills into mentoring opportunities, service activities performed in various community settings including pro bono clinic, and inter-professional learning activities. The provision of service will focus on service which positively impacts the health and wellness of defined community populations. Sections of the course will occur in every fall and spring semester of the Physical Therapy curriculum beginning in the spring semester of year one.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 705. Medical Imaging. (3 Credits)

Medical Imaging presents an overview of basic (plain film) radiographic imaging with an emphasis on the role of the Physical Therapist in clinical decision-making regarding the utilization and interpretation of diagnostic images. Advanced imaging studies will also be addressed with a focus on the strengths and weaknesses of each modality. The course will emphasize imaging of the adult musculoskeletal system, as well as identification of normal anatomy and abnormalities through a routine search pattern. This topic is presented within the current legal and ethical scope of physical therapist practice.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 709. Exercise Science II. (2 Credits)

This seminar explores responses of the human body to exercise in the presence of pathological conditions. Students examine how common pathologies and exercise responses influence one another and learn precautions for certain medical diagnoses. Students independently explore and report on a topic of personal interest.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 723. Cardiopulmonary Sys/Acute Care. (4 Credits)

Cardiopulmonary Systems/Acute Care will address the physiology of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems in healthy and diseased states. Students will learn to evaluate and design appropriate treatment regimes that relate to improving a client's physical well-being. These regimes will cover the spectrum of rehabilitation from the acute care team approach to long-term fitness management.

Prerequisites: Admission to Concordia University’s DPT program and successful completion of prior coursework.

DPT 736. Tissue/Biomechanics/Histology. (3 Credits)

Tissue Biomechanics is an opportunity for students to continue their exploration of neuromusculoskeletal tissue. Biological tissues are examined from a structural and functional perspective. The histology and structure of bone, cartilage, dense connective tissue, peripheral nerves and skeletal muscle are described. Their response to loading, unloading, injury, immobilization and aging are investigated. In addition, fracture management, and the biomaterials used in surgical interventions are discussed. The influence of common prescription and over-the-counter medications observed in clinical practice is discussed as it relates to biological tissue stress.

Prerequisite: successful completion of the first semester in the Physical Therapy program at CUW as a DPT student.

DPT 739. Psychosocial Dimensions of Healthcare III. (1 Credit)

This course is the third in a 3-course sequence that provides students with an opportunity to examine psychological and social factors that influence the client-clinician interaction. Concepts that are discussed through the full sequence are related to personal and professional values, client-clinician relationships, communication, collaborative treatment planning, cultural sensitivity, motivation, adherence, spirituality, response/adjustment to disability and chronic illness, abuse, loss, and grief. This third course focuses on issues of loss, grief, and coping as they affect clients seen in clinical practice. The course is offered concurrently with a student clinical-practice experience, and assignments encourage application of course content to clinical practice.

Prerequisite: DPT 737; DPT 738

DPT 742. Psychosocial Dimensions of Rehabilitation I. (1 Credit)

DPT 743. Psychosocial Dimensions of Rehabilitation II. (1 Credit)

DPT 744. Practice Management. (2 Credits)

Practice Management teaches students the leadership, administration, management and professionalism skills necessary for entry level Physical Therapy practice in the current health care system. The course focuses on the healthcare environment, the business of health care and professional development. Topics of study include characteristics of the US healthcare system, leadership, employment obligations, career planning, and professional development. Practice issues of documentation, billing/coding, case management, and legal/ethical considerations will be addressed. Business topics covered include strategic planning, payment/reimbursement, policies/procedures, risk management, outcomes, quality improvement, budgeting, and marketing.

Prerequisites: Completion of coursework in the professional DPT program, year one and two.

DPT 745. Health Promotion. (2 Credits)

This course explores the role of the Physical Therapist in the areas of health promotion, disability prevention, and wellness, and provides students with applied knowledge in these areas. In addition, students will develop skills in performing community health screenings. Students will demonstrate appropriate application of theories of behavior change and health literacy as they develop programs of health promotion, prevention and wellness in a culturally competent manner to defined population groups. Opportunities for students to incorporate evidence-based practice, educate community groups, demonstrate professional behaviors, and participate in advocacy activities will be made available throughout the course.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 750. Selected Topics in Pediatrics/Adult Neuro. (3 Credits)

This course will be appropriate for those students interested in working with the pediatric as well as the neurological client. The class will be designed to improve the student's ability to perform clinical and standardized evaluations, interpret and organize the data based on the ICF model, and develop evidence-based treatment plans and intervention strategies to address the impairments interfering with function and participation. The goal of this course is to expand and refine clinical decision-making, observation, analysis and handling skills developed in previous courses. This will be accomplished through a variety of strategies including group discussion and problem solving, video analysis, task and movement analysis labs, and client practicum.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 760. Clinical Practice I. (6 Credits)

Physical Therapy Clinical Practice I/II involve two 9-week full-time clinical education experiences or one full-time 18-week experience. They occur after all didactic coursework is complete and provide summative clinical practice opportunities for the students. The practice setting and patient population will be developed in conjunction with the student’s academic advisor to meet student needs.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 761. Clinical Practice II. (6 Credits)

Physical Therapy Clinical Practice I/II involve two 9-week full-time clinical education experiences or one full-time 18-week experience. They occur after all didactic coursework is complete and provide summative clinical practice opportunities for the students. The practice setting and patient population will be developed in conjunction with the student’s academic advisor to meet student needs.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 763. Global Ed - PT Experience. (3 Credits)

This elective course is intended to provide the student with an opportunity for cultural experiences through evaluation and treatment of children and adults with various disabilities in a rural area of Nicaragua through the medical ministry of the Circle of Empowerment where the basic health care needs are being provided by this organization. This course will encourage compassion for the impoverished but also empowerment of the people served. Education to the families, missionary nurse, and the Brigadestas whom the medical missionary has trained will be important to allow the programs that have been implemented to be continued.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 785. Community Practice IV. (1 Credit)

This Community Practice course will provide the student with opportunities to integrate current professional and personal knowledge, attitudes, and skills into service activities performed in various community settings and into inter-professional learning activities. The provision of service will focus on service which positively impacts the health and wellness of defined community populations. Sections of the course will occur in every fall and spring semester of the Physical Therapy curriculum beginning in the spring semester of year one.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 786. Community Clinic III. (1 Credit)

DPT 800. Med Screening & Exam Ortho Res. (1 Credit)

This course is designed to include learning experiences through on-line lectures and independent acquisition of information. This information will prepare the resident for practicing collaboratively in a health care system and communicating effectively with other health care providers. In addition, the resident will acquire examination tools essential for the interpretation of all clinical examination data. This will enable them to identify clinical scenarios that require physician referral through a sound, efficient clinical decision-making process. Likewise, enhanced medical screening skills will help minimize risk to the patient and clinician. Content in the course will include: 1) screening for red flags in the spine and extremities; 2) reviewing medical images of the spine and extremities; 3) performing a quality subjective interview; 4) incorporating evidence-based practice; 5 ) understanding medication interactions and 6) examination and review of case studies. The delivery of content will primarily be through on-line instruction.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the CUW Orthopedic Residency Program

DPT 801. Clin Exam & Treatment of Spine. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to include traditional learning experiences through lecture, hands-on lab experiences and independent acquisition of information. The course will provide scientific knowledge associated with clinical practice of the spine. Content in the course will include: 1) examination and assessment of spine disorders; 2) conservative interventions to address spine pathologies; 3) use of external devices 4) in-depth review/ study of anatomy and kinesiology; 5) management of common post-operative spine conditions; and 6) incorporation of evidence-based practice; 7) examination and review of case studies. The delivery of content will include on-line and face-to-face instruction. The course is intended to not only expand the resident’s understanding of orthopedic physical therapy of the spine, but also to guide orthopedic clinical practice related to common orthopedic spinal disorders.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 802. Clin Exam & Treat of Up Extrem. (1-3 Credits)

This course is designed to include traditional learning experiences through lecture, hands-on lab experiences and independent acquisition of information associated with clinical practice in Physical Therapy. The course will provide scientific knowledge associated with the Upper Extremity (UE). This will include information on the following: 1) examination and assessment of UE disorders; 2) interventions to address UE disorders; 3) use of external devices 4) in-depth review/ study of anatomy and kinesiology; 5) video movement analysis; 6) management of common post-operative conditions; and 7) incorporation of evidence-based practice; 8) review of case studies. The delivery of content will include on-line and face-to-face instruction.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 803. Clin Exam & Treat Lower Extrem. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to include traditional learning experiences through lecture, hands-on lab experiences and independent acquisition of information associated with clinical practice in Physical Therapy. The course will provide scientific knowledge associated with the Lower Extremity (LE). This will include information on the following: 1) examination and assessment of UE disorders; 2) interventions to address UE disorders; 3) use of external devices 4) in-depth review/ study of anatomy and kinesiology; 5) video movement analysis; 6) management of common post-operative conditions; and 7) incorporation of evidence-based practice; 8) review of case studies. The delivery of content will include on-line and face-to-face instruction.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 804. Motor Control for Ortho Pop. (1 Credit)

This course is an advanced Physical Therapy Orthopedic practice experience. This course will incorporate movement analysis for common orthopedic dysfunctions of the UE, LE or spine. The primary role of this course is to develop movement-appropriate intervention techniques with differentiation of deep stabilizing muscles using feed forward actication. The movement strategies acquired in this course can be used as complimentary interventions for general strengthening and/ or manual therapy interventions.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 805. Clin Mentoring for Ortho Res. (1-5 Credits)

This course is an advanced Physical Therapy Orthopedic practice experience. The course is designed to include live clinic learning experiences through one-on-one, face-to-face observation and instruction between an approved clinical mentor and the orthopedic resident. The clinical mentoring begins immediately following enrollment into the Concordia University Orthopedic Residency Program and will last for the 12 month duration of the residency program. The resident will receive guidance from the mentor. However, the resident will also receive learning opportunities based on their own reflection of their clinical performance. The resident will also utilize patient outcomes to analyze their performance. Advanced clinical decision making using best available evidence will be accentuated throughout the mentoring process.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 806. OCS Preparatory Course. (1 Credit)

This course is designed to prepare the resident for the OCS exam for advanced certification through the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties (ABPTS). This is a self-paced, independent study course with various learning guides throughout the course. This is the final course in the Residency curriculum.

Prerequisite: None

DPT 807. Clin Research for Ortho Res. (0.5-1 Credits)

This self-paced course allows the Resident to design a clinical research study or case study including development of a research proposal for IRB approval. The Resident will be guided through the data collection process. Dissemination of research findings will be the culminating activity for the course.

Prerequisite: None