Occupational Therapy-Grad (OT)

OT 501. Introduction to APA Style & Scholarly Writing. (1 Credit)

This 1 credit course is designed to help students to learn how to cite references in American Psychological Association (APA) style and understand plagiarism.

Prerequisite: None

OT 502. Concepts of Occupation. (3 Credits)

This course is intended to ground the first semester students in both theoretical concepts important to occupational therapy practice and practical knowledge about the profession. Theoretically, students will be introduced to those fundamental concepts of occupation-based models of Ecology of Human Performance (EHP) and Occupational Adaptation (OA), as well as the tenants of the CUW OT Program curriculum.

Prerequisite: None

OT 503. Functional Anatomy. (4 Credits)

Functional Anatomy is an integrated approach to the gross anatomy of the human body, with particular emphasis on the musculoskeletal and peripheral nervous systems. Consideration will also be given to the study of cells, tissues, and organ systems. The laboratory portion of the course includes examination of prosected human cadavers. The students will use clinical reasoning to connect human anatomy to occupational performance and relate impairments in body structure and function to activity limitations. Course

Prerequisites: Matriculation in the CUW’s Occupational Therapy Program, or consent of instructor.

OT 504. Introduction to Advocacy and Leadership. (2 Credits)

This course will introduce core concepts of advocacy and leadership in occupational therapy, including exploration of spirituality, legislative issues, and the meaning of advocacy. The course activities will promote development of self-awareness of leadership skills, strengths and areas of growth. Content will introduce participants to topics related to personal, client, community, and professional advocacy. Students will be introduced to the Concordia Occupational Therapy program curriculum design and develop a plan for personal success and growth in the program.

Prerequisite: None

OT 505. Research in Practice I. (3 Credits)

This course will introduce occupational therapy students to best practice in terms of three components: clinical reasoning, theory and evidence. Students will focus on the role of research in this process. Students will apply statistical concepts and research methodology to evaluate the quality and applicability of research to occupational therapy practice. This course will provide a foundation for selecting evidence-based assessments and interventions. Students will also develop foundational skills for contributing to research.

Prerequisite: None

OT 506. Occupations Across the Lifespan. (3 Credits)

This course provides the necessary understanding to the development of the human lifespan beginning at conceptions and ending at death through an occupational lens. This course will cover the physical, cognitive, and emotional changes that occur across the eight major stages of development: prenatal, infancy, early childhood, mid-late childhood, adolescence, early adulthood, middle adulthood, and late adulthood.

Prerequisite: None

OT 507. Explore Community Clinic. (3 Credits)

This course will focus on the OT skills needed to assist patients in occupational performance. Students will complete occupational performance analysis while learning how to grade/modify activities. Students will learn how to train others in assistive equipment, ADLs, and adaptive techniques. Basic transfer techniques, patient handling skills, introduction to a wheelchair, and bed mobility will also be explored. Students will understand and apply clinic management and organization strategies, introduction to billing, chart audits, and HIPAA regulations. They will identify and explain the role of OT and OT process in action while developing their observation skills. Students will also establish rapport with a peer mentor, acting as an assistant to them, giving and receiving feedback, and identifying and participating in TeamSTEPPS.

Prerequisite: None

OT 508. Facilitated Community Clinic. (3 Credits)

This course builds on the skills developed during Explore Community Clinic. Students will be mentored by 4th semester students as they engage in self-reflection activities in order to improve their professional skills and interactions with the client. Students will also continue to develop their own understanding of how their faith impacts their vocation. Finally, students will continue to build their research skills in order to be evidence based practitioners.

Prerequisite: None

OT 509. Functional Neuroscience and Neurorehabilitation I. (4 Credits)

This course is an integrated approach to human nervous system structure and function, and the application of these principles to occupation and occupational therapy assessment following neurological injury or disease. Additionally neuroplasticity and implications for learning, memory, and recovery will be addressed. The course will cover sensory (somatic and special), motor (somatic and autonomic), limbic, cognitive, visual, vestibular, and ventricular systems and their interactions. Common neurological diagnoses and OT assessment of the sensory, motor, and postural systems in a neurological population will be introduced. The laboratory portion of the course includes gross examination of the human nervous system as well as activities designed to integrate neurological concepts.

Prerequisite: None

OT 510. Research in Practice II. (3 Credits)

This course is an introduction to the evidence-based practice process. Students will perform the first 3 steps of the evidence-based practice process, including asking a focused question, locating the best evidence, and critically appraising the evidence. Students will also create scholarly reports based on their appraisal of the literature.

Prerequisite: None

OT 511. Personal Advocacy & Leadership. (1 Credit)

This course is designed to develop students as client advocates, while continuing to promote growth in personal advocacy and leadership. Leadership theories will provide a foundation to enable students to create their own leadership position. Students will build the skills necessary for effective client advocacy, including identifying needs, finding resources, communicating professionally, and using innovation to meet client goals.

Prerequisite: None

OT 512. Clinical Reasoning: Behavioral Health. (3 Credits)

This course covers the diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric disorders commonly seen in occupational therapy practice. Contemporary treatment approaches including interdisciplinary and occupational therapy models, assessment and treatment intervention will be explored. Students will practice leading and participating in group interventions as a primary mode of treatment for mental and behavioral health settings. Students will be exposed to community programs and resources providing mental health treatment in a variety of contexts. Students will develop documentation skills including note writing and treatment/ intervention plans.

Prerequisite: None

OT 513. Occupational Kinesiology and Orthorehabilitation I. (4 Credits)

This course teaches how concepts of biomechanics, human anatomy, and movement affect occupational performance and guide therapeutic intervention. Students will also develop assessment skills and begin to differentiate common pathologies.

Prerequisite: None

OT 521. Foundational Concepts in Occup. (3 Credits)

This course is intended to ground the first year students in theoretical concepts important to occupational therapy practice. Students will be introduced to those fundamental concepts discussed in the occupational therapy (OT) literature and declared as important threads in the CUW OT Program curriculum. Conceptual frameworks from the American Occupational Therapy Association (OT Practice Framework) and World Health Organization (International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health) will be presented. Important events and trends in the history of OT will be discussed, as will professional ethics, contexts of practice, OT organizations and supervision of OT assistants.

Prerequisite: None

OT 523. Clinical Kinesiology. (3 Credits)

This course covers anatomical and mechanical principles of human movement and the application of these fundamentals to the analysis of motor skills. The lab will focus on the observation and evaluation of human movement. Pre-requisites: Admission to the MOT program.

Prerequisite: None

OT 529. Assessment Skills. (3 Credits)

This course covers the beginning professional skill set of client-centered evaluation and use of the occupational therapy process. Students will learn the basic process of performing evaluations following a standardized and non-standardized format, documenting results and the importance of cooperation with the occupational therapy assistant in the screening and evaluation process. Students will also learn to recognize influences on outcomes and how to compare client scores to normative data. This course will cover the skills needed to perform a number of basic evaluations, such as the pinch, grip and 9-hole peg tests, in addition to the skills of observation, interviewing, and use of checklists and rating scales. Psychometric aspects of measurement tools (reliability, validity, etc.) will also be addressed. Students must be enrolled in the MOT program and have successfully completed OT525.

Prerequisite: None

OT 530. Practice Skills. (3 Credits)

This course will focus on the OT skills needed to assist patients in occupational engagement and participation. The students will complete occupational profiles and occupational performance analysis while learning how to grade/adapt activities. Students will learn how to train others in adaptive equipment, ADLs, and adaptive techniques. Basic transfer techniques, patient handling skills, wheelchair mechanics, and bed mobility will also be explored.

Prerequisite: None

OT 535. Global Ed:Curacao. (3 Credits)

this elective course is intended to provide the student with an opportunity for cultural experiences of alternative therapies for children by internationally trained therapists. This course will encourage students’ awareness of investigation into alternative therapies and how families from other cultures interact with therapists to support the growth and development of their children with disabilities. 3 credits.

Prerequisite: None

OT 536. Global Education:Nepal. (3 Credits)

this elective course is intended to provide the student with an opportunity for cultural experiences through evaluation and screening of individuals in a developing country where basic health care needs are severely lacking. This course will encourage compassion for the impoverished and will allow the student a chance to complete assessments, create treatment strategies, and/or provide education when limited resources are available.  There will be structured occasions to share the Gospel of Jesus Christ to individuals through drama, song, crafts and play. Education to teachers and therapists will be offered through training the trainer activities. 3 credits.

Prerequisite: None

OT 537. Global Education: Nicaragua. (3 Credits)

OT 538. Global Education Malawi. (3 Credits)

This elective course is intended to provide the student with an opportunity for cultural experiences through evaluation and screening of individuals in a developing country where basic health care needs are severely lacking. This course will encourage compassion for the impoverished and will allow the student a chance to develop in culturally competent skills by completing assessments, creating treatment strategies, and/or providing education to local physiotherapist and families when limited resources are available. There may be occasions to share the Gospel of Jesus Christ to individuals through drama, song, crafts and/or play. Education and update of current therapy programs may be offered to teachers, parents and/or therapists through “training the trainer”. Interprofessional discussions, opportunities and interventions will be incorporated to allow students to learn from each other’s discipline and the contribution each makes to the health/social care team.

Prerequisite: None

OT 540. Scientific Inquiry I. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to help occupational therapy students acquire beginning level skills related to consuming and producing research. Fundamental scientific inquiry skills related to reading, understanding, and appraising the rehabilitation research literature for the purpose of evidence-based practice is emphasized. This course provides the student with critical reading and appraisal skills that will be used in clinical courses and fieldwork assignments. Students are also exposed to basic concepts of research methodology and a review of conceptually-based statistics that further enhances skills with consuming the scientific literature. The process of producing research is discussed, including topics of grant funding and research ethics; however, actual work on a research project is reserved for subsequent coursework in Scientific Inquiry II (OT 569) and Scientific Inquiry III (OT 582). Students will practice reading and critiquing professional literature in the evidence-based practice project portion of the course. Students will also have the opportunity to research the scientific literature to appraise the evidence for a specific area of clinical practice related to occupational therapy. Students will receive feedback on their ability to write in a scholarly manner.

Prerequisite: None

OT 546. Group Skills. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the use of group dynamic techniques in occupational therapy. Emphasis will be on developing skills and competencies necessary to function as a group leader while working with diverse populations. The concept of therapeutic groups will be explored as well as their function and structure as a psychosocial approach to treatment. A variety of therapeutic groups and topics will be presented along with ethical group leadership. Students will have the opportunity to lead a variety of groups.

Prerequisite: None

OT 548. Group Clinical Practicum. (1 Credit)

This fieldwork portion of the OT 546 Group Skills course will focus on the OT skills needed to effectively plan and lead group sessions. Assignments for the students in this fieldwork will be in conjunction with lessons and objectives of the OT 546 course.

Prerequisite: None

OT 561. Rehabilitation Science: Neurorehabilitation. (3 Credits)

This is a professional skills course focusing on the occupational therapy treatment of people with typical neurological conditions and diagnoses. Principles of Brunnstrom, Rood, PNF, and Bobath are examined. There is opportunity to compare and contrast evidence in the literature about motor learning theories, reflex‐hierarchical and other approaches. Areas of sensation, perception, cognition and effects of traumatic brain injury and SCI are included. Students learn treatment techniques and handling practices in relation to how these are provided within the framework of occupation. Experiences on human volunteers are incorporated as possible to enhance the practical application of theories and skills learned in didactic coursework, and to emphasize learning about how to provide client‐centered care with these populations. Documentation and treatment planning learning activities incorporate elements of activity analysis learned in previous semesters. Finally, when and in what contexts patients are seen are examined in this course.

Prerequisite: None

OT 564. Health & Wellness Promotion for OT. (2 Credits)

This course will introduce the student to health promotion. The concept of health promotion will be discussed through the exploration of wellness models and key components of health promotion and wellness. The student will be able to discuss the difference between rehabilitation and health promotion. This course will provide learning experiences that will enable the student to identify opportunities for the provision of health promotion services as an occupational therapist. Environments for health promotion will be explored that include traditional and nontraditional environments such as school systems and social systems in the community. Students will develop a community presentation in this course that they will deliver in a fieldwork experience in OT 566 Psychosocial Aspects of Wellness Fieldwork. Concurrent registration in OT 566 is required.

Prerequisite: None

OT 565. Psychosocial Practice. (3 Credits)

This course develops OT skills to provide education and effectively address psychosocial barriers to health and wellness in a community setting. This course is a fieldwork experience. Assignments for students in this fieldwork will be in conjunction with lessons in the OT 564 Health & Wellness Promotion for OT course. Concurrent registration in OT 564 is required.

Prerequisite: None

OT 566. Psychosocial Aspects of Wellness Fieldwork. (1 Credit)

This course develops OT skills to provide education and effectively address psychosocial barriers to health and wellness in a community setting. This course is a fieldwork experience. Assignments for students in this fieldwork will be in conjunction with lessons in the OT 564 Health & Wellness Promotion for OT course. Concurrent registration in OT 564 is required.

Prerequisite: None

OT 569. Scientific Inquiry II. (3 Credits)

Scientific Inquiry II is the second in the sequence of three courses designed to help students hone their critical inquiry skills. Students will continue to critically read and critique professional literature and determine its applicability to clinical practice. This course will cover advanced research design and methods for both quantitative and qualitative projects. Students will practice statistical analyses using computer-based statistical packages. Whereas Scientific Inquiry I focuses on becoming a critical consumer of the scientific literature in rehabilitation, Scientific Inquiry II helps students develop beginning level skills as a producer of research in occupational therapy. Students will choose a project related to ongoing research of the professor and prepare a proposal for the Concordia University Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students will pilot test their methods and materials during this semester and begin construction of scientific poster for presentation of findings in Scientific Inquiry III next semester.

Prerequisite: None

OT 571. Work Practice. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to introduce students to issues related to work performance, including work conditioning, work hardening, functional evaluation, supported employment, job coaching, job analysis, and basic ergonomic principles. Pre-requisites: OT 523 and BIO 550.

Prerequisite: None

OT 573. Pediatric Clinical Practicum. (1 Credit)

This course provides students with hands on experience in a pediatric clinical setting under the supervision of an occupational therapy fieldwork educator. Students will observe and practice in the clinical setting performance of assessments, guided interventions, and OT management processes.

Prerequisite: None

OT 575. Fieldwork Seminar. (0 Credits)

Fieldwork Seminar takes place in the 4th semester and was created to review key concepts prior to the students entering their level II fieldwork. Students will apply concepts from other classes and review key skills that are needed for successful level II fieldwork experiences. Students will be challenged to integrate key concepts such as professional communication, transfers, modalities, and inter-professional team approaches. Students will also discuss possible fieldwork scenarios and evaluate possible solutions.

Prerequisite: None

OT 580. Pediatric Practice. (4 Credits)

This course will lay the foundations for the study of pediatric practice through exposure to a variety of major pediatric theories, disabilities, and assessments. The developmental cycle from conception to adolescence will be reviewed, along with the work of major pediatric theorists.

Prerequisite: None

OT 582. Scientific Inquiry III. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the implementation of the research projects initiated in Scientific Inquiry II. Students will finalize IRB approval if necessary, begin data collection, enter collected data into a spreadsheet and perform appropriate analyses. Students will write up results and discussion sections and present findings in scientific poster format to faculty and students at CUW. Opportunity for presentation at state or national conference also exists after the course is completed.

Prerequisites: OT 540 & 569: Scientific Inquiry I & II.

OT 584. Adult Clinical Practicum. (2 Credits)

This course provides students with hands on experience in an adult physical disabilities clinical setting under the supervision of an occupational therapy fieldwork educator. Students will observe and practice in the clinical setting performance of assessments, guided interventions, and OT management processes.

Prerequisite: None

OT 586. Rehabilitation Science: Orthopedics. (3 Credits)

This course will provide students with a client-centered, evidence-based forum to learn about the theories and methods used by occupational therapists for the evaluation and treatment of individuals with orthopedic physical impairments. Pre-requisites: OT 523 and BIO 550.

Prerequisite: None

OT 590. Rehabilitation Science: Integrated. (3 Credits)

This course provides students with a client-centered, evidence-based forum to integrate the evaluation, theory, and treatment of individuals with orthopedic, neurologic, and multiple physical disabilities within different contexts of service delivery (e.g., home health, subacute, case management, etc.). This course is intended to transition the student to fieldwork, so emphasis is placed on independent learning and decision making. Pre-requisites: OT 529, 561 and 586.

Prerequisite: None

OT 595. Community OT Clinic. (3 Credits)

This course will provide the student with hands-on real-time experience with evaluation and treatment of volunteer clients in an on campus clinical setting. It will also allow them the opportunity to participate in documentation of patient assessment and reassessment, interpretation of results, documentation of weekly progress reports and discharge summaries. Occupation-based and client-centered intervention plans will be established by learners. Communication with family members, in addition to collaboration with other health professionals and physicians will be encouraged to support the client in the rehabilitation process. Learners will challenge their clinical decision making skills through research of evidence based practice techniques and presentation of their client’s case to peers.

Prerequisite: None

OT 600. Special Topics in OT. (3 Credits)

This course explores specialized topics in occupational therapy practice, building on the foundational knowledge of previous clinical and scientific courses. Units in this course emphasize evaluation and treatment techniques and strategies, emerging practice issues, and best practice in a variety of settings contexts. Students will apply and analyze occupational therapy theories, evidence, and clinical reasoning.

Prerequisite: None

OT 601. Advanced Clinical Practice. (3 Credits)

The focus of this course is to help students refine their working knowledge of occupational therapy theory. Students will explore various issues of importance to contemporary clinical practice. Students will apply concepts of theories learned in prior coursework along with current research results in a problem‐based learning (PBL) case study format.

Prerequisite: None

OT 602. Clinical Reasoning: Pediatrics. (3 Credits)

This course will lay the foundation for the study of occupational therapy in pediatric settings through exposure to a variety of developmental disabilities, pediatric assessment tools, treatment interventions, and areas of practice. Application of a variety of common pediatric frames of references will occur through case studies. Students will demonstrate clinical reasoning through the occupational therapy process of evaluation and treatment.

Prerequisite: None

OT 603. Practice Management. (3 Credits)

This is a basic skills course focusing on skills all OT practitioners need to administratively function in typical health care environments. In addition, business development and management areas of study will be incorporated to prepare students to assume more traditional management roles in a variety of models of service delivery. Students will be prepared to collaborate with other health professionals on the treatment team, to supervise OTA and support personnel, and to understand and realize the need for smooth organizational functioning to effectively conduct business as an OT.

Prerequisite: None

OT 604. Summer Pediatrics Camp. (1 Credit)

This course provides students with hands-on experience in a pediatric clinical setting under the supervision of an occupational therapy fieldwork educator or related professional. Students will observe and practice in the clinical setting performance of assessments, guided interventions, and OT management processes.

Prerequisite: None

OT 605. Community Practice. (3 Credits)

Community Practice will provide students with opportunities to investigate and experience current issues related to the practice of occupational therapy in community settings. The theoretical basis for community practice, performance of a needs assessment, literature review and justification, grant writing, legal liability, budgeting, and program planning emphasizing a specific community setting will be discussed. Students will explore the impact of their core values on their practice as an occupational therapist and their personal level of responsibility in the pursuit of social justice within their community. This course addresses the OT curriculum design philosophical threads of occupation‐based and client‐centered practice with an appreciation for service to community.

Prerequisite: None

OT 612. Behavioral Health Fieldwork. (1 Credit)

This course provides students with hands-on experience in a behavioral health setting under the supervision of an occupational therapy fieldwork educator or related professional. Students will observe and practice in the clinical setting performance of assessments, guided interventions, and OT management processes.

Prerequisite: None

OT 614. Clinical Reasoning: Adult Practice Areas. (3 Credits)

This course provides students with a client-centered, evidence-based forum to integrate the evaluation, theory, and treatment of individuals with orthopedic, neurologic, and multiple physical disabilities within different contexts of service delivery (e.g., home health, subacute, case management, etc.). This course is intended to transition the student to fieldwork, so emphasis is placed on independent learning and decision making.

Prerequisite: None

OT 620. Level II Fieldwork I. (6 Credits)

A minimum of three months full-time or six months half-time will be required for this course; each with a minimum of 408 hours (unless otherwise approved prior to clinical placement and following AOTA guidance). The experience is designed to promote clinical reasoning and reflective practice, while developing a repertoire of assessment/treatment interventions related to human performance. Development of professionalism will emphasize application of ethical principles and Christian values.

Prerequisite: None

OT 621. Clinical Reasoning: Orthorehab II. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to teach evaluation, treatment planning, and documentation for orthopedic injuries, including occupation-based interventions and adjunctive/preparatory interventions (exercise, orthotic intervention, physical agents). By the end of the course, students will identify and apply indications, precautions, and contraindications for various interventions.

Prerequisite: None

OT 622. Level II Fieldwork II. (6 Credits)

A minimum of three months full-time or six months half-time will be required for this course; each with a minimum of 408 hours (unless otherwise approved prior to clinical placement and following AOTA guidance). The experience is designed to promote clinical reasoning and reflective practice, while developing a repertoire of assessment/treatment interventions related to human performance. Development of professionalism will emphasize application of ethical principles and Christian values.

Prerequisite: None

OT 624. Level II Fieldwork III. (1-6 Credits)

A minimum of three months full-time or six months half-time will be required for this course; each with a minimum of 408 hours (unless otherwise approved prior to clinical placement and following AOTA guidance). The experience is designed to promote clinical reasoning and reflective practice, while developing a repertoire of assessment/treatment interventions related to human performance. Development of professionalism will emphasize application of ethical principles and Christian values.

Prerequisite: None

OT 625. Community Advocacy and Leadership. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to develop students as community advocates, while continuing to promote growth in personal advocacy and leadership. Students will build the skills necessary for effective community advocacy, including identifying needs, finding resources, communicating professionally, increasing legislative and regulatory literacy, and using innovation to address occupational injustice within communities.

Prerequisite: None

OT 632. Occupations of Health and Wellness. (3 Credits)

This course will introduce the student to health promotion. The concept of health promotion will be discussed through the exploration of wellness models and key components of health promotion and wellness. The student will be able to discuss the difference between rehabilitation and health promotion. This course will provide learning experiences that will enable the student to identify opportunities for the provision of health promotion services as an occupational therapist. Environments for health promotion will be explored that include traditional and nontraditional environments such as school systems and social systems in the community.

Prerequisite: None

OT 635. Community Clinic: Leading the OT Process. (3 Credits)

This course will offer students hands-on experience with both evaluating and implementing interventions. 3rd semester OT students will be paired with 1st semester OT students, in order to enhance their leadership skills. This course will prepare OT students for the final pro bono clinic semester, in which they will utilize leadership skills.

Prerequisite: None

OT 641. Research in Practice III. (3 Credits)

This course prepares students to integrate theory and evidence with a client-centered perspective, implementing the five steps of evidence-based practice in a specific clinical context. Students will build on skills learned in Research Practice I and Research in Practice II, and apply this knowledge in a specific clinical context to address a question or need posed by a partnering community occupational therapist or occupational therapy practice setting. Students will elaborate on the fourth and fifth steps by contributing to the research process to generate new knowledge to fuel best practice and the steps of evidence-based practice. Students will work directly with a community site to write a clinical question linked to practice, review existing literature, create a plan to gather and analyze evidence to address the clinical question, and begin to formulate a plan for dissemination of results.

Prerequisite: None

OT 643. Community Clinic: Management and Supervision. (2 Credits)

This course will provide the student with hands-on experience with evaluation and treatment of volunteer clients in a clinical setting. The students will be mentoring 2nd semester students through the OT Process. Students will have the opportunity to participate in documentation of patient assessment, reassessment, interpretation of results, documentation of weekly progress reports, and discharge summaries. Occupation based and client centered intervention plans will be established by learners. Communication with family members, in addition to collaboration with other health professionals and physicians will be encouraged to support the client in the rehabilitation process. Learners will challenge their clinical decision making skills through research of evidence based practice techniques and presentation of their client’s case to peers.

Prerequisite: None

OT 645. Gerontology and Assistive Technology Concepts to Promote Occupational Performance. (3 Credits)

This course examines the impact of the aging process on engagement in occupation. The role of OT in rehabilitation, habilitation, and promotion of health and wellness for older adults will be explored, along with special considerations when working with this population. A secondary focus of the course is to learn the role of assistive technology in supporting participation in occupations throughout the adult lifespan.

Prerequisite: None

OT 650. Practice Management. (2 Credits)

This course teaches students how to develop an understanding of leadership, administration, management and the professionalism skills necessary for entry level practice in the current healthcare system. The course focuses on the healthcare environment, the business of healthcare and professional development. Topics of study include characteristics of the US healthcare system, leadership, employment obligations, career planning, and professional development. Practice issues of documentation, billing/coding, case management, and legal/ethical considerations will be addressed. Business topics covered include strategic planning, payment/reimbursement, policies/procedures, risk management, outcomes, quality improvement, budgeting, and marketing.

Prerequisite: None

OT 655. Professional Advocacy&Ldrshp. (2 Credits)

This course is designed to develop students as advocates for the profession of occupational therapy, while continuing to promote growth in personal advocacy and leadership. Students will build the skills necessary to communicate and advocate for issues that influence practice, specifically promoting occupational therapy as an evidence-based and science-driven profession.

Prerequisite: None

OT 660. Clinical Reasoning: Gerontology. (3 Credits)

This course examines the impact of the aging process on engagement in occupation. The role of OT in rehabilitation, habilitation, and promotion of health and wellness for older adults will be explored, along with special considerations when working with this population. A secondary focus of the course is to learn the role of assistive technology in supporting participation in occupations throughout the adult lifespan.

Prerequisite: None

OT 665. Clinical Reasoning: Neurorehabilitation II. (3 Credits)

This course is a professional skills course using the principles begun in Functional Neuroscience and Neurorehabilitation I. This course integrates principles of human nervous system structure and function to inform and advance understanding of occupational therapy assessment and treatment of individuals with neurological injury or disease. Principles of sensorimotor and contemporary treatment approaches to common neurological diagnoses, including cerebral vascular accident, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson disease, concussion, and feeding and swallowing disorders will be examined. The course will include the practical application of occupational theories and frames of reference to treatment planning, along with practice in the patient handling skills and documentation required for client-centered care. Elements of activity analysis learned in previous semesters will be incorporated throughout.

Prerequisite: None

OT 670. Clinical Reasoning: Work/Ergo. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to introduce students to issues related to work performance, including work conditioning, work hardening, functional evaluation, supported employment, job coaching, job analysis, and basic ergonomic principles.

Prerequisite: None

OT 675. Level II Fieldwork A. (6 Credits)

This course is designed to promote clinical reasoning and reflective practice, while developing a repertoire of assessment/treatment interventions related to human performance. Development of professionalism will emphasize application of ethical principles and Christian values. A minimum of three months full-time or six months half-time will be required for this course; each with a minimum of 408 hours (unless otherwise approved prior to clinical placement and following AOTA guidance).

Prerequisite: None

OT 680. Level II Fieldwork B. (6 Credits)

This course is designed to promote clinical reasoning and reflective practice, while developing a repertoire of assessment/treatment interventions related to human performance. Development of professionalism will emphasize application of ethical principles and Christian values. A minimum of three months full-time or six months half-time will be required for this course; each with a minimum of 408 hours (unless otherwise approved prior to clinical placement and following AOTA guidance).

Prerequisite: None

OT 701. Information Technology Lab . (3 Credits)

this course provides an orientation to online learning and the Transitional Master of Occupational Therapy Program (TMOT) for students entering the master’s level. As a lab course, the focus is on experiencing the skills needed for active participation in online graduate level courses. This lab is designed to orient you pragmatically to Concordia University and the Occupational Therapy program while developing the skills needed to be successful. Within the course students will establish initial contact with their academic advisor.

Prerequisite: None

OT 705. Research in Practice IV: Capstone Planning. (3 Credits)

This course prepares students to apply the knowledge gained in Research in Practice I-III to plan their capstone experience. ACOTE standard C.2.0 indicates the capstone may vary by student and site interests and needs. The student will design an appropriate capstone project that integrates research practice skills to meet the need of the setting.

Prerequisite: None

OT 710. OTD Capstone Experience. (7 Credits)

This course will provide an in-depth exposure to one or more of the following: clinical practice skills, research skills, administration, leadership, program and policy development, advocacy, education, and theory development. The doctoral capstone consists of two parts: a 14 week capstone experience at a community site and a capstone project. The student will complete an individual capstone project to demonstrate synthesis and application of knowledge gained, which will be disseminated.

Prerequisite: None

OT 901. Prof Writing for Occup Therap. (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of techniques and tools for developing scholarly writing projects for evidence based clinical practice. Students will focus on understanding the process of knowledge dissemination and use of electronic tools for evidence retrieval, reference management, and methods for dissemination of scholarly information.

Prerequisite: None

OT 910. OT Theory & Conc Current HC En. (3 Credits)

This course will introduce students to current policy influencing the future direction of the profession of Occupational Therapy. Students will investigate changes as they relate to the theoretical underpinnings of the profession and analyze changes and trends in Occupational Therapy over time.

Prerequisite: None

OT 911. Adv. Evidenced-Based Practice. (4 Credits)

This course will help students develop advanced skills in evidence‐based occupational therapy practice. Students will demonstrate a working knowledge of research methodology and statistics to continue to hone their skills in critical appraisal of scientific literature. Students will search for scientific evidence, read and critically appraise the evidence, and apply this information to clinical decision making. Students will consider topics in this course that may develop into their capstone project.

Prerequisite: None

OT 915. Occupational Science. (3 Credits)

This course will examine the relationship of occupation to health and well-being. Students will investigate how theories of occupation bring about change in their client populations through the application of client-centered, occupation-based clinical practices. Occupational science will also be studied as a theoretical, foundational construct influencing the profession of occupational therapy.

Prerequisite: None

OT 916. Mentoring/Clinical Education. (3 Credits)

This course will provide students the opportunity to learn how to educate health professionals by reviewing learning theories and teaching strategies. Students will be introduced to models of mentorship while exploring the characteristics of an effective mentor. The course will develop skills in conflict resolution and communication in a community setting.

Prerequisite: None

OT 920. Adv Anat & Kines of Upp Extrem. (3 Credits)

This course will analyze purposeful human movement through a combination of advanced anatomy and an in-depth look at structure and function. Biomechanical factors influencing musculoskeletal balance, efficiency, and dysfunction will be studied throughout the continuum from anatomic foundations to kinesthetic and proprioceptive movement. Peer-reviewed literature in the areas of biomechanics and foundational science will be used to complement course topics.

Prerequisite: None

OT 921. Conditions & Eval of Up Extrem. (3 Credits)

This course will investigate comprehensive evaluative strategies of the upper extremity and relate proper subjective and objective measures to common clinical diagnoses. With the intent of data driven interventions and outcomes measurements, students will use current literature to establish a repertoire of evaluative tools which will guide their clinical decision making.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of the first two semesters of the OTD program.

OT 922. Surg Proc Inform Clin Dec-Mak. (3 Credits)

This course will analyze common surgical procedures as a means to facilitate client-centered clinical decision-making post-operatively. Attention will be paid to a comprehensive understanding of the indications, precautions, and contraindications associated with surgical procedures so that the therapist not only can rationalize chosen interventions, but provide in-depth education to their clients. Current literature and surgical demonstrations will be included as learning tools in this course.

Prerequisite: None

OT 923. Evidence-Based Up Extrem Rehab. (3 Credits)

This course will employ previous learning, including anatomy, kinesiology, diagnoses, evaluations, and surgical procedures to establish evidence-based intervention planning for clients with multiple diagnoses. Students will be expected to identify diagnoses of personal interest and come prepared with current peer-reviewed literature which will facilitate the creation of comprehensive evaluation, intervention, education, and outcome planning. Specific attention will be paid to modalities and orthotic fabrication and the evidence which supports these adjunctive methods.

Prerequisite: None

OT 925. OTD Capstone I. (1 Credit)

This course will provide students an opportunity to explore potential areas for their doctoral capstone projects. Organized into units, this course will allow students guided inquiry that allows them to propose a project that is both meaningful to them and complements their personal and professional aspirations for pursuing a doctoral degree.

Prerequisite: None

OT 926. OTD Capstone II. (1 Credit)

This course will comprise the foundational preparation for individual or paired doctoral capstone projects. Organized into units, this course will include goal setting, review of pertinent literature, and initiation of content preparation for the capstone.

Prerequisite: None

OT 927. OTD Capstone III. (2 Credits)

This course will provide students an opportunity to build the content and work towards completion of their capstone projects.

Prerequisite: None

OT 928. OTD Capstone IV. (2 Credits)

This course will provide students an opportunity to complete and present their capstone projects.

Prerequisite: None

OT 930. Educating the Adult Learner. (3 Credits)

This course will focus on adult development and learning theories. Students will identify the stages of adult development and examine the concept of andragogy versus pedagogy. Major theories of adult learning and how they relate to instructional practices will be explored. Physical and cognitive changes will be discussed in the context of teaching adult learners. This course will focus on teaching practices in both a traditional and online environment.

Prerequisite: None

OT 931. Clinical Pract to Higher Educ. (3 Credits)

this course is designed to prepare the student for employment in high education. Accreditation bodies, policies and issues related to higher education will be explored. General expectations of entry level faculty at public and private institutions will be identified. This course will review curriculum development, strategic planning, and program evaluation. 3 credits.

Prerequisite: None

OT 932. Assess Higher Edu Allied Hlth. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to focus on research, policy, and best practices in course and program assessment in higher education specifically related to allied health professions. This will include an exploration of assessment to curriculum planning and in program evaluation. Students will identify, define, and interpret the types of valid and reliable education assessment methods and explore uses for formative, summative and authentic assessment. Informal and formal assessment methods will be explored and legal and ethical practices will also be addressed.

Prerequisite: None

OT 933. Ins Dsgn Hghr Ed Alld Hlth Pro. (3 Credits)

This course will focus on the instructional design process and applying adult learning theory, communication media, and technology to develop interactive, collaborative educational experiences for higher education allied health professions. Established and upcoming instructional design models will be used to assist future higher education faculty develop effective courses in face-to-face, online, and/or blended formats.

Prerequisite: None

OT 940. Theory & Evidence of Ped Treat. (3 Credits)

this course will challenge students to consider theoretical mechanisms explaining effectiveness of pediatric occupational therapy interventions. Students will also explore available scientific evidence on selected interventions. Topics explored can be based on student practice areas. 3 credits.

Prerequisite: None

OT 941. Impl Evid-Based Trt in Ped OT. (3 Credits)

This course will provide students the opportunity to translate knowledge gained from theory and evidence on OT interventions to their clinical practice. Students will select at least one intervention and develop a plan to implement it in their own practice. Faculty and expert clinicians will provide support through the process of implementing the treatment.

Prerequisite: None

OT 942. Impact Gov Policy Ped Practice. (3 Credits)

This course will explore federal and state policies and ways they affect early intervention/school-based practice areas. Students will consider trends in early intervention/school-based practice and how government policies impact service provision.

Prerequisite: None

OT 943. Motor Cntrl & Motor Learn Ped. (3 Credits)

This course will examine current theories of motor control and motor learning as they relate to pediatric rehabilitation. Students will integrate clinical experience with theory and evidence for interventions based on current motor control and motor learning techniques. The course will primarily focus on reaching, grasping, and prehension in typically developing children and those with neuromuscular conditions.

Prerequisite: None

OT 999. OTD Capstone. (6 Credits)